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Famous people all over the world

Category Archive: Politics

Diego Rivera – famous painter

Diego Rivera – famous painter

Diego Rivera – famous painter

Diego Rivera was a Mexico’s most famous painter, muralist, and political activist.
His full name was Diego Maria de la Concepcion Juan Nepomuceno Estanislao de la Rivera y Barrientos Acosta y Rodriguez.
Diego was born on December 8, 1886 in the city of Guanajuato in the northwest of Mexico into a wealthy family. Diego had a twin brother who died at the age of two. As a child, he was very intelligent and curious about everything.
Since 1896 to 1902 Rivera took lessons in drawing and painting at the Art Academy in Mexico City. He was awarded a scholarship that enabled him to go to Spain. From 1907 to 1921 he lived in Europe. He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Madrid (1907), then lived and worked in Paris (1909-1920), in Italy (1920-1921), also visited Belgium, the Netherlands and the UK. He was familiar with the Parisian artistic elite, including Pablo Picasso and Alfonso Reyes.
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Eamon de Valera – president of Ireland

Eamon de Valera - president of Ireland

Eamon de Valera – president of Ireland

Eamon de Valera was an Irish revolutionary leader and statesman. He served as prime minister and later president of Ireland (1959-1973).
Eamon was born on October 14, 1882 in New York. He was the son of a Spanish father and an Irish mother and, as a child, lived on his uncle’s farm in Ireland. At this time, Eire, as it is known today, was part of the United Kingdom.
De Valera graduated from the Royal University of Ireland in 1904 and became a mathematics teacher.
In 1916, de Valera took part in a rebellion against the British and he was sent to prison; in 1917 he was released in an amnesty. He became leader of Sinn Fein, the nationalist movement. In 1918 he was sent to prison again but managed to escape to the USA.
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Georges d’Anthes – man who killed Pushkin

Georges d'Anthes – man who killed Pushkin

Georges d’Anthes – man who killed Pushkin

Georges d’Anthes went down in history primarily as a murderer of great Russian poet Alexander Pushkin. After the deportation from Russia, he made a brilliant political and business career and died at the age of 83.
Georges Charles de Heeckeren d’Anthes was born on February 5, 1812 in Colmar, Upper Rhine, France.
His ancestors were Scandinavians from the island of Gotland, in the XVI century they moved to Germany. In 1720 they appeared in France. In 1730, the great-grandfather of Georges opened armory manufacture in Alsace and 10 years later he received a heraldic title.
Georges was the third child in the family and the eldest of the sons.
D’Anthes was the relative of Pushkin and Natalia Goncharova. His grandmother, Countess Gattsfeld, was the wife of a Russian diplomat Count Musin-Pushkin, a distant relative of Musina-Pushkina, grandmother of Natalia Nikolaevna Goncharova.
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Maggie Lena Walker – civic leader

Maggie Lena Walker - civic leader

Maggie Lena Walker – civic leader


Maggie Lena Walker was an African American entrepreneur and civic leader. Walker was the first woman bank president in the United States.
Maggie Walker was born in 1867 in Richmond, Virginia. Her mother, Elizabeth Draper, married William Mitchell while they were both working in the home of Elizabeth Van Lew, a famous Union spy. A few years later William was found drowned. Elizabeth supported her family by doing laundry. Maggie had to help her mother.
In 1886 she married Armstead Walker and gave birth to three sons, one of whom died in infancy. In 1915 her husband Armstead was shot and killed by their son, Russell, who mistook his father for a burglar.
While she was still in high school Walker joined the Independent Order of St. Luke, which helped African Americans take care of the sick and bury the dead. In 1899, Walker became Grand Secretary Treasurer of the St. Luke organization. She liked to describe the order as a woman’s organization that gave equal opportunity to men.
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Helen Keller – Woman of Courage

Helen Keller – Woman of Courage

Helen Keller – Woman of Courage

Helen Keller was an American writer, lecturer and political activist.
Helen Adams Keller was born on June 27, 1880 in Tuscumbia, Alabama. At the age of nineteen months Keller suffered disease which resulted in completely lost of hearing and vision. When Helen was seven years old her parents decided to find a teacher for their daughter. Alexander Graham Bell examined the girl. He was a doctor for speech correction as well as being the inventor of the telephone. Bell sent a special teacher, Anne Sullivan, to stay with Helen as her governess.
After school Keller entered Radcliffe College, where she received a bachelor’s degree. Later she lived with her constant companion Sullivan.
Though both blind and deaf, Helen traveled the world over, crusading for improvement in the education and life of the physically handicapped.
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James Barry Munnik Hertzog

James Barry Munnik Hertzog - South African soldier

James Barry Munnik Hertzog – South African soldier


James Barry Munnik Hertzog was South African soldier and political figure, one of the leaders of the Afrikaner Nationalist Movement, the Prime Minister of South African Union from June 30, 1924 to September 5, 1939.
James Barry was born on April 3, 1866 near Wellington, Cape Province. James was born in an old Afrikaner family and was named after the surgeon James Barry.
In 1889-1892 he studied law at the University of Amsterdam, and from 1892 to 1895 had a private law practice in Pretoria, after which he was appointed to the Supreme Court of the Orange Free State.
At the beginning of the Second Boer War Hertzog became deputy commander of the army and one of the organizers of the guerrilla war against the British troops.
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Emmeline Pankhurst – English reformer

Emmeline Pankhurst - English reformer

Emmeline Pankhurst – English reformer

Emmeline Pankhurst was the English reformer who led the movement for women’s suffrage in Great Britain.
Emmeline Goulden was born on July 4, 1858 in Manchester. Emmeline was the eldest of five daughters. She also had five brothers. At the age of 14 she accompanied her mother to a women’s suffrage meeting. The next few years Emmeline spent in Paris attending school. After her return she married Richard Pankhurst, a barrister and an activist in radical causes, especially in women’s suffrage. They had four children.
In 1880, Mrs Pankhurst began a campaign to get the vote for women. At first, she and her supporters (known as ‘suffragettes’) spoke at public meetings, wrote articles and gave out leaflets. When politicians ignored their campaign, they threw stones at the windows of the Prime Minister’s house and interrupted Parliamentary debates shouting ‘Votes for Women’. One suffragette even threw herself in front of one of the King’s horses during an important horse race and was killed. Suffragettes were often arrested and sent to prison.
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