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World of faces

Famous people all over the world

Category Archive: History

Betsy Ross – woman who sewed American flag

Betsy Ross – woman who sewed American flag

Betsy Ross – woman who sewed American flag

Betsy Ross was the Philadelphia seamstress and upholsterer. She was the woman who sewed the first U.S. flag in 1776. On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress, on a motion from John Adams, adopted the stars and stripes as the national flag.
Elizabeth Griscom was born on January 1, 1752 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was the eighth of 17 children. Her father, Samuel, operated a building business. The business was established by her great-grandfather Andrew Griscom, who had emigrated from England in 1680. Her parents, Samuel and Rebecca Griscom, belonged to the Society of Friends (Quakers), so in their house there was an atmosphere of strict discipline. Betsy learned embroidery from her great-aunt Sarah Griscom.
In 1773 she married John Ross. Ross and her husband opened an upholstery and sewing shop on Arch Street, Philadelphia. John was a member of the state militia. He was killed three years later in an explosion.
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Clara Barton – angel of the battlefield

Clara Barton – angel of the battlefield

Clara Barton – angel of the battlefield


Clara Barton was the founder of the American Red Cross. She went down in history as the angel of the battlefield for her work tending to wounded soldiers in the American Civil War. Her work made her a symbol of humanitarianism.
Clara Harlow Barton was born on December 25, 1821 in Oxford, Massachusetts. She was the youngest child in a family. Her father, Stephen Barton, was a farmer and state legislator. The girl was educated at home. At the age of 15 Clara began teaching at nearby schools. Later she taught school in Massachusetts and New Jersey.
In 1853 she was appointed as copyist in the Patent Office in Washington, D.C., becoming the first woman in America to hold such a government post.
In 1861 the American Civil War began. The soldiers were suffering and dying because there were not enough medical supplies. Barton organized a private agency to buy supplies. In 1862 she worked as an unpaid nurse.
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Ethan Allen – patriot and soldier

Ethan Allen - patriot and soldier

Ethan Allen – patriot and soldier


Ethan Allen was an American soldier, war hero for independence of the United States, a politician, philosopher, writer, as well as a farmer and businessman. He is best known as one of the founders of the US state of Vermont. He won an important early victory in the American Revolution. He led the Green Mountain Boys against the British and captured Fort Ticonderoga in 1775.
Ethan Allen was born on January 21, 1738, in Litchfield, Connecticut. Allen was the eldest son of a substantial farmer. His father died early and Allen had to take care of his mother and seven other children.
He wrote a number of pamphlets on such diverse subjects as the taking of Ticonderoga, Vermont’s controversies with New York, and religion.
In 1757 he fought in the French and Indian War. In 1762 Allen became an ironworker. Several years later he moved to Vermont, which was not a separate colony at the time. Allen organized the Green Mountain Boys. After the start of the American Revolution, the group fought the British.
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Jane Addams – peace activist

Jane Addams - peace activist

Jane Addams – peace activist

Jane Addams was an American social reformer and peace activist who devoted her life to helping the poor. She founded Hull House to serve needy immigrants in Chicago, Illinois.
Jane Addams was born on September 6, 1860, in Cedarville, Illinois. She was the eighth child in the family. Jane was just two when her mother died, so, the girl and her siblings were brought up by their father. Their father was an idealist and philanthropist, and a state senator of Illinois for 16 years.
In 1882 she graduated from Rockford Female Seminary and then went to Europe. In 1887 she visited Toynbee Hall in England. The reformers tried to improve the lives of workers exploited by the Industrial Revolution.
In 1889 Addams and Ellen Gates Starr rented a big house in Chicago, which was opened to immigrants. The women called their social settlement Hull House. They helped revolutionize social services for the poor and immigrants.
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Amelia Mary Earhart – woman pilot

Amelia Mary Earhart – woman pilot

Amelia Mary Earhart – woman pilot

Amelia Mary Earhart was an American aviator. She is world’s best-known woman pilot. She was the first woman to fly alone across the Atlantic Ocean.
Amelia Mary Earhart Putnam was born on July 24, 1897 in Atchison, Kansas. Until she was 12 she lived with her wealthy maternal grandparents in Atcheson, Kansas.
In 1909 Amelia and her younger sister, Muriel, went to Des Moines, Iowa to live with their parents. In 1914 her mother took the girl and moved to Chicago, where Amelia graduated from Hyde Park School the following year.
Amelia was a volunteer nurse in a hospital for veterans in Toronto where she worked until 1918.
In the winter of 1920 Earhart saw her first air show and took her first airplane ride. She took lessons at Bert Kinner’s airfield. On December 15, 1921 she received her license from the National Aeronautics Association (NAA).
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Bartolomeu Dias – Portuguese explorer

Bartolomeu Dias – Portuguese explorer

Bartolomeu Dias – Portuguese explorer


Bartolomeu Dias was a Portuguese explorer who discovered the Cape of Good Hope and opened the sea route to the Indian Ocean. He was the first European to round the South Africa. He was one of the most important European explorers before Christopher Columbus.
Bartolomeu Dias de Novais (sometimes spelled Bartholomew Diaz) was born in about 1450 near Lisbon, Portugal. Very little is known about Dias’s early life. De Novais usually added to his name was first documented in 1571, when King Sebastian I appointed his grandson, Paulo Dias de Novais a governor of Angola.
In his youth, Dias studied mathematics and astronomy at the University of Lisbon.
In 1487 Bartolomeu Dias sailed from Portugal with orders from King John II to continue exploration of a landmark on the coast of South-West Africa. The King wanted Dias to discover a sea route to India and to seek information about the Christian empire of Abyssinia.
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Sitting Bull – Indian chief

Sitting Bull – Indian chief

Sitting Bull – Indian chief

Sitting Bull was a chief of an Indian tribe Hunkpapa, who tried to keep U.S. settlers from taking over Indian lands. He is known for his role in the battle of the Little Bighorn. His name in his native Dakota language sounds like Tatanka Iyotake, Bison, sitting on the ground.
Sitting Bull was born in 1831 near the Grand River. As a boy he was called Slow (Hunkeshni). Subsequently, Sitting Bull became a renowned warrior.
Outstanding Hunkpapa chief had a lot of followers among all the tribes of the Lakota. Since 1863 he fought against US troops. He led the Indian tribes, who opposed resettlement. When US Army General Henry Hastings Sibley attacked hunting Lakota in June 1863, Sitting Bull led the Lakota group to avenge the soldiers.
When another tribe of the Sioux, under the direction of leaders Red Cloud and Frantic Horse started a war against the construction of the railroad through their territory, Sitting Bull took part in it. Red Cloud War lasted from 1866 to 1868 years. Sitting Bull refused to join the peace agreement and continued attacks on the armed forces of the whites. His authority among all the tribes of the Sioux had increased, so a number of historians believe that during this period he was elected supreme leader of the Sioux.
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